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IMAGING DIAGNOSIS—SPINAL EPIDURAL HEMANGIOSARCOMA IN A DOG

Authors

  • Cristian de la Fuente,

    1. Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Clinical Science, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain
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  • Martí Pumarola,

    1. Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Clinical Science, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain
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  • Sònia Añor

    Corresponding author
    1. Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to Sònia Añor, at the above address. E-mail: sonia.anor@uab.es

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  • This work received no grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • This work has not been presented in any meeting.

Abstract

An 8-year-old, male Boxer was examined for an acute onset of ambulatory paraparesis. Neurologic examination was consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. Myelography revealed an extradural spinal cord compression in the region of the T10-T13 vertebrae. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a well-defined epidural mass lesion was detected. The mass was mildly hyperintense on T1-weighted, hyperintense on T2-weighted and STIR images compared to normal spinal cord and enhanced strongly and homogenously. Postmortem examination confirmed a primary epidural hemangiosarcoma. Findings indicated that the MRI characteristics of spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma may mimic other lesions including meningioma and epidural hemorrhages/hematomas of non-neoplastic etiology.

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