PALLIATIVE RADIATION THERAPY OUTCOMES FOR CATS WITH ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA (1999–2005)

Authors


Abstract

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounts for approximately 10% of all feline tumors. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe outcomes for a group of cats with oral SCC that were treated with palliative radiation therapy. Fifty-four cats met the inclusion criteria of nonresectable, oral SCC treated with coarse fractionated megavoltage (MeV) radiation therapy. Radiation therapy for all cats was delivered with a 6 MeV linear accelerator. Total radiation doses of 24 Gray to 40 Gray were administered in three to four fractions, once-per-week over 4 to 5 weeks. Concurrent chemotherapy protocols varied and were administered at the discretion of the clinician and client. Forty-nine patients completed the planned treatment protocols. Overall mean and median survival times for cats completing the planned treatment protocols were 127 and 92 days (n = 49). Mean and median survival times of cats receiving palliative radiation therapy alone were 157 and 113 days (n = 12). Mean and median survival times of patients receiving both radiation therapy and chemotherapy were 116 and 80 days (n = 37). Patients with sublingual tumors had a median survival time of 135 days (n = 15), compared to mandibular tumors that had a median survival time of 80 days (n = 26). For the majority of patients that completed the planned treatment protocol (65%), owners reported a subjectively improved quality of life. Findings from this uncontrolled study supported the use of palliative radiation therapy for cats with nonresectable oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Ancillary