IMAGING DIAGNOSIS—DISSEMINATED PERITONEAL LEIOMYOMATOSIS IN A DOG

Authors

  • Markay L. Isaac,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to Markay L. Isaac, Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, 422 Raymond Stotzer Pkwy, College Station, TX, 77845. E-mail: mlisaac@cvm.tamu.edu

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  • Kathy A. Spaulding,

    1. Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
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  • Zachary J. Goodrich

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Surgical Residency: Texas A&M University, TX
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  • Funding sources: Texas A&M University, Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences

  • Previous presentations or abstracts: On October 05, 2012 Franklin R. Lopez presented a 15-minute report on the pathology in this case to attendees at the Charles Louis Davis, D.V.M. Foundation, 22nd Annual Program and Slide Seminar of the Southcentral Division in Galveston, TX.

Abstract

A 17-month-old male Labrador retriever presented for evaluation of an abdominal mass felt during abdominal palpation. Multiple variably sized cystic masses were identified on sonographic and radiographic images. Exploratory laparotomy revealed multiple peritoneal masses that exhibited atypical contractions and lacked an identifiable organ of origin. Histology and immunohistochemistry of multiple surgically excised masses was consistent with benign tumors of smooth muscle origin (leiomyomas). The presence of multiple peritoneal leiomyomas in this dog is consistent with disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis. Two years after diagnosis and multiple surgical interventions, continual insidious enlargement of leiomyomas was identified on ultrasound and CT.

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