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ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATION-INDUCED DISPLACEMENT OF CANINE ABDOMINAL ORGANS IN DORSAL AND VENTRAL RECUMBENCY USING MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

Authors

  • Cintia R. Oliveira,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
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  • Margaret A. Henzler,

    1. School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
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  • Rebecca A. Johnson,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
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  • Randi Drees

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to Randi Drees, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, United Kingdom. E-mail: rdrees@rvc.ac.uk.

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  • This project was funded by the Companion Animal Fund of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Rebecca Johnson is supported by grant 1UL1RR025011 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program of the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Abstract

Respiratory-induced organ displacement during image acquisition can produce motion artifacts and variation in spatial localization of an organ in diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations. The purpose of this prospective study was to quantify respiratory-induced abdominal organ displacement in dorsal and ventral recumbency using five normal dogs. All dogs underwent CT examinations using 64 multidetector row CT (64-MDCT). A “3-dimensional (3D) apneic CT exam” of the abdomen was acquired followed by a “4-dimensional (4D) ventilated CT exam.” The liver, pancreas, both kidneys, both medial iliac lymph nodes, and urinary bladder were delineated on the 3D-apneic examination and the organ outlines were compared to the maximum alteration in organ position in the 4D-ventilated examination. Displacement was measured in dorsal-to-ventral (DV), right-to-left (RL), and cranial-to-caudal (CC) directions. Respiratory-induced displacement of canine abdominal organs was not predictable and showed large variability in the three directions evaluated. For most canine abdominal organs, dorsal recumbency provided overall the least amount of displacement among all directions evaluated except for liver and urinary bladder. For liver, a large variability was found for all directions and a statistically significant difference was found only in the RL direction with ventral recumbency exhibiting less displacement (P = 0.0099). For the urinary bladder, ventral recumbency also provided less displacement but this was statistically significant only in the RL direction (P < 0.0001). Findings from this study indicated that dorsal recumbency may be preferred for minimizing respiratory motion artifacts in whole abdomen studies, but ventral recumbency may be preferred for liver and urinary bladder studies when respiration cannot be controlled.

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