Assessment of Human Exposures to Animal Vaccines Using Poison Control Records, 2000–2009

Authors

  • L. Edison,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathogenesis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, One Health Office, National Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Georgia Department of Public Health, Acute Disease Epidemiology Section, Atlanta, GA, USA
    • Correspondence

      L. Edison. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, One Health Office, Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathogenesis, National Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases (Edison and Rubin), 1600 Clifton Road NE, Mailstop A30, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA. Tel.: +1 404639 1829; Fax: +1 404693 1805; E-mail: Ledison@cdc.gov

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  • J. Schulte,

    1. Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, Tallahassee, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. CDC, Global AIDS Program, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • J. Schauben,

    1. Department of Emergency Medicine, Florida/USVI Poison Information Center – Jacksonville, University of Florida Health Science Center –Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL, USA
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  • R. Kay,

    1. Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, Tallahassee, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Baptist Medical Center Downtown, Jacksonville, FL, USA
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  • C. Rubin

    1. Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathogenesis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, One Health Office, National Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • The findings and conclusions in the manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The work has not been presented elsewhere and is not under consideration at any other journal. No related papers have been written or published. There are no potential conflicts of interest concerning this publication.

Summary

To characterize human exposures to vaccines intended for animals, evaluate the human risk due to these exposures and determine whether there is sufficient surveillance in place to monitor them. Retrospective analysis of surveillance data (2000–2009). Information collected by poison specialists during calls reporting human exposure to an animal vaccine product, made to one of the 57 United States Poison Control Centers. Data from the National Poison Data System were analysed to determine the number of calls due to human exposures to animal vaccines, and descriptive statistics were generated to characterize the exposures by age, gender, medical outcome, exposure site, exposure route, vaccine type and intended species, aetiologic agent, call date and exposure reason. Overall, the human health effects were minor, primarily due to unintentional parenteral exposure. Less than 15% of the reports were classified as occupational, and 80% of the exposures took place outside of a workplace or healthcare facility. Almost 60% of calls were due to exposure to the West Nile Virus vaccine; the others distributed among a variety of vaccines. Unintentional exposure to animal vaccines appears to occur almost exclusively among untrained individuals who may benefit from more effective education about the risks and benefits of administering vaccines. Improved reporting of adverse outcomes is essential to adequately define the extent of human exposure and risks associated with availability of new vaccines.

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