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Cryptosporidium hominis Subtypes and Enterocytozoon bieneusi Genotypes in HIV-Infected Persons in Ibadan, Nigeria

Authors

  • A. B. Ayinmode,

    1. Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
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  • H. Zhang,

    1. Institute of Parasite Disease Prevention and Control, Henan Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Zhengzhou, China
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  • H. O. Dada-Adegbola,

    1. Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
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  • L. Xiao

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
    • Correspondence:

      L. Xiao. Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mail Stop D66, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. Tel.: +1 404 718 4161; Fax: +1 404 718 4197; E-mail: lxiao@cdc.gov

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Summary

Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon are common opportunistic pathogens in HIV+ patients in developing countries, especially those do not have access to antiretroviral therapy. To determine the distribution of genotypes/subtypes of Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon bieneusi, faecal specimens were collected from 132 HIV+ persons attending a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. By polymerase chain reaction, eight and ten patients were identified as positive for Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi, respectively. Seven of the Cryptosporidium specimens were identified as C. hominis, while the remaining one as the new species C. viatorum recently identified in the United Kingdom. DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene showed that the C. hominis belonged to three common subtype families: Ia (in three patients), Ib (in one patient) and Ie (in one patient). In contrast, DNA sequencing of the E. bieneusi internal transcribed spacer products showed the occurrence of genotypes associated with both humans (Peru 8 in one patient, Nig2 in two patients and a new genotype in one patient) and animals (D in one patient and Type IV in five patients). Low CD4+ cell count was identified as a risk factor for both cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis.

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