EMBODIMENT AND REBIRTH IN THE BUDDHIST AND HINDU TRADITIONS

Authors

  • David L. Gosling


  • In Gosling, D. L. (2013), Embodiment and Rebirth in the Buddhist and Hindu Traditions, published in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 48(4), the figure captions were placed wrongly. The captions have been corrected as of 4 Dec 2013.

Abstract

The belief that humans are more than their bodies is to a large extent represented in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions by the notion of rebirth, the main difference being that the former envisages a more corporeal continuing entity than the latter. The author has studied the manner in which exposure to science at a postgraduate level impinges on belief in rebirth at universities and institutes in India and Thailand. Many Hindu and Buddhist scientists tend to believe less in a reincarnating entity because of their scientific work, but Buddhists can point to their empty self doctrine, which has resonances with models of an extended self, rejecting the notion of a core self (anattā) and replacing it with a system of interdependent parts (paṭicca samuppāda), which governs previous and future lives.

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