Prestin and the cochlear amplifier

Authors

  • Peter Dallos,

    1. Departments of Neurobiology & Physiology and Communication Sciences & Disorders, The Neuroscience Institute, The Hugh Knowles Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jing Zheng,

    1. Departments of Neurobiology & Physiology and Communication Sciences & Disorders, The Neuroscience Institute, The Hugh Knowles Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mary Ann Cheatham

    1. Departments of Neurobiology & Physiology and Communication Sciences & Disorders, The Neuroscience Institute, The Hugh Knowles Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author P. Dallos: Department of Neurobiology & Physiology, Northwestern University, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. Email: p-dallos@northwestern.edu

Abstract

In non-mammalian, hair cell-bearing sense organs amplification is associated with mechano-electric transducer channels in the stereovilli (commonly called stereocilia). Because mammals possess differentiated outer hair cells (OHC), they also benefit from a novel electromotile process, powered by the motor protein, prestin. Here we consider new work pertaining to this protein and its potential role as the mammalian cochlear amplifier.

Ancillary