Caffeine in the neonatal period induces long-lasting changes in sleep and breathing in adult rats

Authors

  • Gaspard Montandon,

    1. Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, M5s 1A8, Canada
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Hôpital St-François d’Assise, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Richard L. Horner,

    1. Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, M5s 1A8, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Richard Kinkead,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Hôpital St-François d’Assise, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Aida Bairam

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Hôpital St-François d’Assise, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author G. Montandon: Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada.  Email: gaspard.montandon@utoronto.ca

Abstract

Caffeine is commonly used clinically to treat apnoeas and unstable breathing associated with premature birth. Caffeine antagonizes adenosine receptors and acts as an efficient respiratory stimulant in neonates. Owing to its persistent effects on adenosine receptor expression in the brain, neonatal caffeine administration also has significant effects on maturation of the respiratory control system. However, since adenosine receptors are critically involved in sleep regulation, and sleep also modulates breathing, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal caffeine treatment disrupts regulation of sleep and breathing in the adult rat. Neonatal caffeine treatment (15 mg kg−1 day−1) was administered from postnatal days 3–12. At adulthood (8–10 weeks old), sleep and breathing were measured with a telemetry system and whole-body plethysmography respectively. In adult rats treated with caffeine during the neonatal period, sleep time was reduced, sleep onset latency was increased, and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep was fragmented compared to controls. Ventilation at rest was higher in caffeine-treated adult rats compared to controls across sleep/wake states. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were significantly reduced in caffeine-treated rats compared to control rats across sleep/wake states. Additional experiments in adult anaesthetized rats showed that at similar levels of arterial blood gases, phrenic nerve activity was enhanced in caffeine-treated rats. This study demonstrates that administration of caffeine in the neonatal period alters respiratory control system activity in awake and sleeping rats, as well as in the anaesthetized rats, and also has persistent disrupting effects on sleep that are apparent in adult rats.

Ancillary