Total target volume is a better predictor of whole brain dose from gamma stereotactic radiosurgery than the number, shape, or location of the lesions

Authors


Abstract

Purpose:

To assess the hypothesis that the volume of whole brain that receives a certain dose level is primarily dependent on the treated volume rather than on the number, shape, or location of the lesions. This would help a physician validate the suitability of GammaKnife® based stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSR) prior to treatment.

Methods:

Simulation studies were performed to establish the hypothesis for both oblong and spherical shaped lesions of various numbers and sizes. Forty patients who underwent GKSR [mean age of 54 years (range 7–80), mean number of lesions of 2.5 (range 1–6), and mean lesion volume of 4.4 cm3 (range 0.02–22.2 cm3)] were also studied retrospectively. Following recommendations of QUANTEC, the volume of brain irradiated by the 12 Gy (VB12) isodose line was measured and a power-law based relation is proposed here for estimating VB12 from the known tumor volume and the prescription dose.

Results:

In the simulation study on oblong, spherical, and multiple lesions, the volume of brain irradiated by 50%, 10%, and 1% of maximum dose was found to have linear, linear, and exponentially increasing dependence on the volume of the treated region, respectively. In the retrospective study on 40 GKSR patients, a similar relationship was found to predict the brain dose with a Spearman correlation coefficient >0.9. In both the studies, the volume of brain irradiated by a certain dose level does not have a statistically significant relationship (p ≥ 0.05) with the number, shape, or position of the lesions. The measured VB12 agrees with calculation to within 1.7%.

Conclusions:

The results from the simulation and the retrospective clinical studies indicate that the volume of whole brain that receives a certain percentage of the maximum dose is primarily dependent on the treated volume and less on the number, shape, and location of the lesions.

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