SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

Authors


Abstract

Purpose:

To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform.

Methods:

Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests.

Results:

Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41).

Conclusion:

This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms.

Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav Kolli and Robert G. Gould for time devoted to the study. Data acquisition and analysis was performed by the authors independent of the funding source.

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