Poster — Thur Eve — 35: The impact of intensity- and energy-modulated photon radiotherapy (XMRT) optimization on a variety of organ geometries

Authors

  • McGeachy P.,

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
    2. Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB
    3. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
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  • Zinchenko Y.,

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
    2. Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB
    3. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
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  • Villarreal-Barajas J. E.,

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
    2. Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB
    3. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
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  • Khan R.

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
    2. Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB
    3. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
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Abstract

We previously reported on a novel, modulated in both energy and intensity; photon radiotherapy (XMRT) optimization technique. The purpose of this investigation was to test this XMRT optimization against conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization on four different organ test geometries. All geometries mimicked clinically relevant scenarios. Both IMRT and XMRT were based on a linear programming approach where the objective function was the mean dose to healthy organs and organ-specific linear dose-point constraints were used. For IMRT, the beam energy was fixed to 6 MV while XMRT optimized in terms of both 6 and 18 MV beams. All plans consisted of a seven beam coplanar arrangement. All organ geometries were contoured on a 25cm diameter cylindrical water phantom in open source radiotherapy research software known as CERR. Solutions for both IMRT and XMRT were obtained for each geometry using a numerical solver Gurobi. Analyzing the quality of the solutions was done by comparing dose distributions and dose volume histograms calculated using CERR. For all four geometries, IMRT and XMRT solutions were comparable in terms of target coverage. For two of the geometries, IMRT provided an advantage in terms of reduced dose to the healthy structures. XMRT showed improved dose reduction to healthy organs for one geometry and a comparable dose distribution to IMRT for the remaining geometry. The inability to exploit the benefits of using multiple energies may be attributed to limited water phantom diameter and having the majority of the organs in close proximity to the transverse axis.

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