SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

Authors


Abstract

Purpose:

The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff.

Methods:

In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment.

Results:

Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment.

Conclusion:

Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

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