SU-E-T-350: Effective Point of Measurement and Total Perturbation Correction P for Parallel-Plate Ion Chambers in High-Energy Photon Beams

Authors

  • Langner N,

    1. Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), Giessen, DE
    2. Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg, DE
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  • Czarnecki D,

    1. Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), Giessen, DE
    2. Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg, DE
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  • von Voigts-Rhetz P,

    1. Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), Giessen, DE
    2. Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg, DE
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  • Zink K

    1. Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), Giessen, DE
    2. Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg, DE
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Abstract

Purpose:

This paper aims to determine the effective point of measurement and the total perturbation correction p of parallel-plate chambers for clinical photon dosimetry.

Methods:

The effective point of measurement (EPOM) was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system with the EGSnrc user code egs_ chamber. Depth dose curves of the ionization chambers were calculated in a water phantom for several high energy photon spectra (4, 6, 10, 15, 18 MV-X). Different normalization criterions (normalization to the maximum of the depth dose curve and normalization to the value in 10 cm depth) have been applied. The EPOM was determined by shifting the normalized depth dose curve of a small water voxel against the depth ionization curve until the disagreement (calculated by the root mean square deviation) reaches a minimum. In addition, the total perturbation correction p was calculated by the ratio of the dose to water and the product of the dose determined in the chamber and the water to air stopping power ratio.

Results:

The EPOM varied slightly depending on the chosen normalization criterion. For all chambers the necessary shift of the EPOM decreased linearly with increasing beam quality specifier TPR20/10. For the Roos and NACP chamber, the results were positive suggesting that the chambers need to be shifted towards the focus. For the Markus chamber, the required shift was negative and for the Advanced Markus chamber partly negative and partly positive. The total perturbation correction p was almost independent of the depth. Only for regions below 1 cm the perturbation correction deviated significantly from unity.

Conclusion:

In the present study, the effective point of measurement and the total perturbation correction p was determined for four parallel-plate ionization chambers and five clinical relevant photon spectra. Applying the calculated EPOM, the residual perturbation correction p was mostly depth independent.

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