TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Jermoumi M,

    1. Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA
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  • Sajo E,

    1. Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA
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  • Houari K,

    1. Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA
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  • Ngwa W

    1. Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA
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Abstract

Purpose:

Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy.

Methods:

The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freely downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose.

Results:

For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies.

Conclusion:

The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.

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