WE-AB-BRB-12: Nanoscintillator Fiber-Optic Detector System for Microbeam Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

Authors

  • Rivera J,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Dooley J,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Belley M,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Stanton I,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Langloss B,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Therien M,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Yoshizumi T,

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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  • Chang S

    1. University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC
    2. University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    3. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
    4. Duke University, Durham, NC
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Abstract

Purpose:

Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiation therapy that has demonstrated a higher therapeutic ratio than conventional radiation therapy in animal studies. There are several roadblocks in translating the promising treatment technology to clinical application, one of which is the lack of a real-time, high-resolution dosimeter. Current clinical radiation detectors have poor spatial resolution and, as such, are unsuitable for measuring microbeams with submillimeter-scale widths. Although GafChromic film has high spatial resolution, it lacks the real-time dosimetry capability necessary for MRT preclinical research and potential clinical use. In this work we have demonstrated the feasibility of using a nanoscintillator fiber-optic detector (nanoFOD) system for real-time MRT dosimetry.

Methods:

A microplanar beam array is generated using a x-ray research irradiator and a custom-made, microbeam-forming collimator. The newest generation nanoFOD has an effective size of 70 µm in the measurement direction and was calibrated against a kV ion chamber (RadCal Accu-Pro) in open field geometry. We have written a computer script that performs automatic data collection with immediate background subtraction. A computer-controlled detector positioning stage is used to precisely measure the microbeam peak dose and beam profile by translating the stage during data collection. We test the new generation nanoFOD system, with increased active scintillation volume, against the previous generation system. Both raw and processed data are time-stamped and recorded to enable future post-processing.

Results:

The real-time microbeam dosimetry system worked as expected. The new generation dosimeter has approximately double the active volume compared to the previous generation resulting in over 900% increase in signal. The active volume of the dosimeter still provided the spatial resolution that meets the Nyquist criterion for our microbeam widths.

Conclusion:

We have demonstrated that real-time dosimetry of MRT microbeams is feasible using a nanoscintillator fiber-optic detector with integrated positioning system.

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