Vision 20/20: Molecular-guided surgical oncology based upon tumor metabolism or immunologic phenotype: Technological pathways for point of care imaging and intervention

Authors

  • Pogue Brian W.,

    1. Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Department of Surgery, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755
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  • Paulsen Keith D.,

    1. Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755; Department of Surgery, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755; and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755
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  • Samkoe Kimberley S.,

    1. Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Department of Surgery, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755
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  • Elliott Jonathan T.,

    1. Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755
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  • Hasan Tayyaba,

    1. Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Strong Theresa V.,

    1. Vector Production Facility, Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294
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  • Draney Daniel R.,

    1. LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504
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  • Feldwisch Joachim

    1. Affibody AB, Solina SE 171 69, Sweden
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Abstract

Surgical guidance with fluorescence has been demonstrated in individual clinical trials for decades, but the scientific and commercial conditions exist today for a dramatic increase in clinical value. In the past decade, increased use of indocyanine green based visualization of vascular flow, biliary function, and tissue perfusion has spawned a robust growth in commercial systems that have near-infrared emission imaging and video display capabilities. This recent history combined with major preclinical innovations in fluorescent-labeled molecular probes, has the potential for a shift in surgical practice toward resection guidance based upon molecular information in addition to conventional visual and palpable cues. Most surgical subspecialties already have treatment management decisions partially based upon the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer, as assessed from molecular pathology of the biopsy tissue. This phenotyping can inform the surgical resection process by spatial mapping of these features. Further integration of the diagnostic and therapeutic value of tumor metabolism sensing molecules or immune binding agents directly into the surgical process can help this field mature. Maximal value to the patient would come from identifying the spatial patterns of molecular expression in vivo that are well known to exist. However, as each molecular agent is advanced into trials, the performance of the imaging system can have a critical impact on the success. For example, use of pre-existing commercial imaging systems are not well suited to image receptor targeted fluorophores because of the lower concentrations expected, requiring orders of magnitude more sensitivity. Additionally the imaging system needs the appropriate dynamic range and image processing features to view molecular probes or therapeutics that may have nonspecific uptake or pharmacokinetic issues which lead to limitations in contrast. Imaging systems need to be chosen based upon objective performance criteria, and issues around calibration, validation, and interpretation need to be established before a clinical trial starts. Finally, as early phase trials become more established, the costs associated with failures can be crippling to the field, and so judicious use of phase 0 trials with microdose levels of agents is one viable paradigm to help the field advance, but this places high sensitivity requirements on the imaging systems used. Molecular-guided surgery has truly transformative potential, and several key challenges are outlined here with the goal of seeing efficient advancement with ideal choices. The focus of this vision 20/20 paper is on the technological aspects that are needed to be paired with these agents.

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