Poster - 49: Assessment of Synchrony respiratory compensation error for CyberKnife liver treatment

Authors

  • Liu Ming,

    1. Carleton University
    2. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa University
    3. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa University
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  • Cygler Joanna,

    1. Carleton University
    2. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa University
    3. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa University
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  • Vandervoort Eric

    1. Carleton University
    2. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa University
    3. The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa University
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Abstract

The goal of this work is to quantify respiratory motion compensation errors for liver tumor patients treated by the CyberKnife system with Synchrony tracking, to identify patients with the smallest tracking errors and to eventually help coach patient's breathing patterns to minimize dose delivery errors. The accuracy of CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory motion compensation was assessed for 37 patients treated for liver lesions by analyzing data from system logfiles. A predictive model is used to modulate the direction of individual beams during dose delivery based on the positions of internally implanted fiducials determined using an orthogonal x-ray imaging system and the current location of LED external markers. For each x-ray pair acquired, system logfiles report the prediction error, the difference between the measured and predicted fiducial positions, and the delivery error, which is an estimate of the statistical error in the model overcoming the latency between x-ray acquisition and robotic repositioning. The total error was calculated at the time of each x-ray pair, for the number of treatment fractions and the number of patients, giving the average respiratory motion compensation error in three dimensions. The 99th percentile for the total radial error is 3.85 mm, with the highest contribution of 2.79 mm in superior/inferior (S/I) direction. The absolute mean compensation error is 1.78 mm radially with a 1.27 mm contribution in the S/I direction. Regions of high total error may provide insight into features predicting groups of patients with larger or smaller total errors.

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