Effects of Relaxing Music on Salivary Cortisol Level after Psychological Stress

Authors

  • STÉPHANIE KHALFA,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Neuropsychology, INSERM EMI-U 9926, Université de la Méditerranée, Faculté de Médecine Timone, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France
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  • SIMONE DALLA BELLA,

    1. Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
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  • MATHIEU ROY,

    1. Laboratory of Music Neuropsychology and Auditory Cognition, University of Montreal, and Department of Psychology CP 6128 Succursale Centre-Ville Montréal H3C 3J7 Quebec, Canada
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  • ISABELLE PERETZ,

    1. Laboratory of Music Neuropsychology and Auditory Cognition, University of Montreal, and Department of Psychology CP 6128 Succursale Centre-Ville Montréal H3C 3J7 Quebec, Canada
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  • SONIA J. LUPIEN

    1. Laboratory of Human Psychoneuroendocrine Research, Douglas Hospital Research Center, and McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Verdun H4H 1R3 Quebec, Canada
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Address for correspondence: Dr. Stéphanie Khalfa, Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Neuropsychology, INSERM EMI-U 9926, Université de la Méditerranée, Faculté de Médecine Timone, 27, Bd Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France. Voice: (33)-04-91-29-98-15; fax: (33)-04-91-78-99-14; skhalfa@skhalfa.com.

Abstract

Abstract: The goal of the present study was to determine whether relaxing music (as compared to silence) might facilitate recovery from a psychologically stressful task. To this aim, changes in salivary cortisol levels were regularly monitored in 24 students before and after the Trier Social Stress Test. The data show that in the presence of music, the salivary cortisol level ceased to increase after the stressor, whereas in silence it continued to increase for 30 minutes.

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