Perceiving Prosody in Speech

Effects of Music Lessons

Authors

  • WILLIAM FORDE THOMPSON,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
      Address for correspondence: Dr. William Forde Thompson, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada. Voice: 905-569-4733; fax: 905-569-4734; b.thompson@utoronto.ca.
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  • E. GLENN SCHELLENBERG,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
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  • GABRIELA HUSAIN

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada
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Address for correspondence: Dr. William Forde Thompson, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada. Voice: 905-569-4733; fax: 905-569-4734; b.thompson@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

Abstract: In two experiments, musically trained and untrained adults were tested on their ability to match spoken utterances with their tonal analogues (tone sequences that retained the pitch and temporal patterns of the utterances). In both cases, musical training was associated with superior performance, indicating an enhanced ability to extract prosodic information from spoken phrases.

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