Superior Canal Dehiscence Is Not Due to Cephalic Displacement of the Labyrinth

Authors

  • VALERIA L. POTYAGAYLO,

    1. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
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  • CHARLEY C. DELLA SANTINA,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
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  • LLOYD B. MINOR,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    3. Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
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  • JOHN P. CAREY

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    • Address for correspondence: John Carey, MD, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Room 6255, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287. Voice: 410-955-7381; fax: 410-955-0035. jcarey@jhmi.edu

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Abstract

Abstract: Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome may have a congenital basis. CT scans of 44 control and 21 dehiscent superior canals were examined to determine if dehiscent canals were more cephalically placed or vertically oriented than control canals. Results showed that neither was the case. Instead, the defect may be in the process of ossification above the superior canal.

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