HLA Class I Supertypes in Type 1 Diabetic Children in an Urban Children's Hospital

Authors

  • Zoltan Antal,

    1. Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York, USA
    2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
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  • Irene Jarchum,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
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  • Teresa P. DiLorenzo

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
    2. Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
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Address for correspondence: Teresa P. DiLorenzo, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461. Voice: +718-430-2014; fax: +718-430-8711. dilorenz@aecom.yu.edu

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas, in which CD8+ T cells play a critical role. The diversity in the HLA alleles expressed among various racial and ethnic groups leads to great variability in antigen presentation and recognition by CD8+ T cells in the context of MHC class I molecules. To date, studies aimed at identifying disease-relevant antigenic epitopes have focused on using mice transgenic for HLA-A*0201, a common allele, particularly among Caucasians. We present HLA class I typing data from 88 children with type 1 diabetes at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore, where the patient population is ethnically diverse, but largely minority. When categorized into the HLA supertypes A2, A3, B7, and C1, 77% of those studied have alleles belonging to at least one supertype, and of these patients, 65% do not belong to the A2 supertype, which is the supertype represented by the HLA-A*0201 allele. These results support the need for studies using HLA transgenic mice expressing MHC molecules representative of a variety of HLA supertypes, particularly when searching for antigenic epitopes applicable for study among largely urban, minority pediatric populations.

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