Tobacco Exposure and Diabetes-Related Autoantibodies in Children

Results from the ABIS Study

Authors

  • AnnaKarin Johansson,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Göran Hermansson,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Center, Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden
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  • Johnny Ludvigsson,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Center, Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden
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  • for the ABIS Study Group

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Center, Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden
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Address for correspondence: AnnaKarin Johansson, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@imv.liu.se

Abstract

Passive smoking has decreased in recent years (“increased hygiene”). Less environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) gives increased hygiene that, if the hygiene hypothesis is true, in turn might give more autoimmune diseases. The presence of auto antibodies is considered to be an early indicator of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Because tobacco exposure may influence the immune system, we analyzed the relation between passive smoking and development of autoantibodies. A subsample (n= 8794) of the children in the ABIS study was used for this analysis. The parents answered questionnaires on smoking from pregnancy and onwards, and blood samples from the children aged 2.5–3 years were analyzed for GADA and IA-2A. Results showed that there was no significant difference in the prevalence of GADA or IA-2A (>95 percentile) between tobacco-exposed and nonexposed children. It was concluded that passive smoking does not seem to influence development of diabetes-related autoantibodies early in life.

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