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MicroRNA Genes

Are They Susceptibility Candidates for Human Type 1 Diabetes?

Authors

  • Li Zhou,

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
    2. Department of Pathology
    3. Henry Ford Hospital Immunology Program, Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, MI, USA
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    • *

      L.Z. and H.H contributed equally to this work.

  • Hongzhi He,

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
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    • *

      L.Z. and H.H contributed equally to this work.

  • Jenny X. Mi,

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
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  • Changgui Li,

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
    2. Section of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Qingdao University Medical School, Qingdao, Shandong, China
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  • Byung Lee,

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
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  • Qing-Sheng Mi

    1. Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine
    2. Department of Pathology
    3. Section of Dermatology/Department of Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA
    4. Henry Ford Hospital Immunology Program, Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, MI, USA
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Address for correspondence: Dr. Q. S. Mi, Henry Ford Hospital Immunology Program, Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Henry Ford Health Systems, 1 Ford Place, Detroit, MI 48202 USA. Voice: +313-876-1017. qmi1@hfhs.org. Voice: +706-721-3507; fax: +706-721-3482. qmi@mail.mcg.edu

Abstract

Human type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder with complex genetic inheritance. To date, more than 19 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) susceptibility loci have been mapped to specific chromosome regions in the human. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of evolutionarily conserved small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes without affecting mRNA levels. There are a growing number of reports that miRNAs link to the regulation of different biological pathways associated with human diseases. However, the potential role of miRNAs in human T1D is still unknown. To investigate the possible involvements of miRNAs in human T1D on a genome-wide basis, we have mapped 530 miRNAs and compared their locations to the current IDDM loci. We found that at least 27 miRNAs are located in 9 human IDDM loci. More interestingly, some of them potentially target autoimmune- and β-cell-related genes. Our data represent a genome-wide search for a potential correlation between the genomic position of miRNAs and specific IDDM loci, indicating that miRNAs may be susceptibilty candidates or biomarkers for human T1D.

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