Inhibitory effect of apigenin on benzo(a)pyrene-mediated genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice

Authors

  • Tajdar Husain Khan,

    1. Section of Chemoprevention and Nutrition Toxicology, Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India.
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  • Tamanna Jahangir,

    1. Section of Chemoprevention and Nutrition Toxicology, Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India.
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  • Lakshmi Prasad,

    1. Section of Chemoprevention and Nutrition Toxicology, Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India.
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  • Sarwat Sultana

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Chemoprevention and Nutrition Toxicology, Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India.
      Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India. E-mail: sarwat786@rediffmail.com
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Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062, India. E-mail: sarwat786@rediffmail.com

Abstract

Apigenin, a bioflavonoid, is abundantly present in fruits and vegetables and possesses potential chemopreventive properties against a wide variety of chronic diseases. In this study we investigated the anti-genotoxic effects of apigenin against a known genotoxicant, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) (125 mg kg−1 orally) toxicity in Swiss albino mice. B(a)P administration led to induction of cytochrome P-450 (CYP), aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and DNA strand breaks (P < 0.001), which was suppressed by apigenin (2.5 and 5 mg kg−1 orally) dose dependently (P < 0.001). B(a)P-induced depletion in the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), quinone reductase (QR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was also shown to be restored by apigenin pre-treatment (P < 0.001). A simultaneous significant and dose-dependent reduction was noted in DNA strand breaks and in-vivo DNA damage (P < 0.001), which gives some insight into restoration of DNA integrity in modulator groups. These results strongly support the protective nature of apigenin against B(a)P-induced toxicity.

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