Large molecules as anti-adhesive compounds against pathogens

Authors

  • N. Wittschier,

    1. University of Münster, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • C. Lengsfeld,

    1. University of Münster, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany
    2. University of Düsseldorf, Institute for Microbiology, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40 225 Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • S. Vorthems,

    1. University of Münster, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • U. Stratmann,

    1. University of Münster, Institute of Anatomy, Vesaliusweg 2-4, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • J. F. Ernst,

    1. University of Düsseldorf, Institute for Microbiology, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40 225 Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • E. J. Verspohl,

    1. University of Münster, Institute for Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, Hittorfstrasse 58, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • A. Hensel

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Münster, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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University of Münster, Institute For Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany. E-mail: ahensel@uni-muenster.de

Abstract

Anti-adhesive compounds are potential prophylactic tools in alternative treatment regimes against bacterial infection, as bacterial adhesion is commonly mediated by carbohydrate-protein interactions between surface adhesions of microorganisms and the host cell. The use of exogenous polyvalent, high-molecular carbohydrates and tannin-like plant-derived compounds should antagonize the adhesive interaction. A range of carbohydrates and carbohydrate- and proanthocyanidin-enriched plant extracts were screened for potential anti-adhesive effects against Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Candida albicans in different in-situ assays on primary tissue. The adhesion of H. pylori on human stomach tissue was effectively blocked by glucuronic acid-enriched polysaccharides from immature okra fruits (Abelmoschus esculentus). These compounds also had strong in-vitro effects against C. jejuni (inhibition up to 80%), but were ineffective in an in-vivo study in infected chicken broilers due to metabolism in the gastrointestinal system. Polysaccharides from Glycyrrhizia glabra, also enriched with glucuronic acid, showed strong anti-adhesive properties against H. pylori and P. gingivalis (inhibition 60–70%). Pelargonium sidoides extract, containing mainly polymeric proanthocyanidins, was effective against H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. Due to the multifunctional adhesive strategy of C. albicans, no effective compounds were detected against this yeast. Structure-activity relationships are presented and the potential in-vivo use of carbohydrate-based anti-adhesives is discussed.

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