Sleep-related laryngeal obstruction presenting as snoring or sleep apnea

Authors

  • Neil B. Kavey MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY.
    2. The Sleep Disorders Center, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.
    • Sleep Disorders Center, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Ave., New York, NY 10032
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  • Jamie Whyte BA,

    1. The Sleep Disorders Center, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.
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  • Andrew Blitzer MD,

    1. The Department of Clinical Otolaryngology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY.
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  • Stephen Gidro-Frank BS

    1. The Sleep Disorders Center, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.
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Abstract

The difference between snoring (with or without sleep apnea) and laryngeal stridor resulting from laryngeal dysfunction may not be readily apparent. Two cases of Shy-Drager syndrome and one undiagnosed case in which laryngeal dysfunction was exacerbated by sleep are reported. Such dysfunction might create life-threatening situations for which emergency tracheostomy should be considered. The importance of differentiating stridor from snoring is discussed.

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