How i do it head and neck and plastic surgery a targeted problem and its solution: Endoscopic septoplasty

Authors

  • William C. Giles MD,

    1. The Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Va.
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  • Charles W. Gross MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Va.
    • Department of ORLS-HNS, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Box 430, Charlottesville, VA 22908
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  • Adam C. Abram MD,

    1. The Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Va.
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  • W. Michael Greene MD,

    1. The Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Va.
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  • Ted G. Avner MD

    1. The Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Va.
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  • Presented at the Meeting of the Southern Section of the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc., Boca Raton, Fla., January 15, 1993.

Abstract

Often there is a need to address the status of the nasal septum during functional endonasal sinus surgery. The outcome of a sinus procedure can be enhanced if the surgeon has better exposure of the operative area or if the patient receives a larger nasal airway, which provides laminar air flow. We present a technique of managing septal deviations and obstructions that adds little additional time to the sinus procedure and allows direct evaluation of the septum with the endoscopes. We describe this relatively simple technique, indications for its use, and results of the first 38 cases.

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