Seizuring cat: what to ask, what to do?

Authors

  • Viktor Palus DVM DECVN MRCVS,

    1. European Specialist in Veterinary Neurology, Dick White Referrals Station Farm, London Road, Six Mile Bottom, Suffolk, CB8 0UH
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Salih Eminaga GPCert(SAS) MRCVS,

    1. ECVN Resident in Neurology/Neurosurgery, Dick White Referrals Station Farm, London Road, Six Mile Bottom, Suffolk, CB8 0UH
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Giunio Bruto Cherubini DVM DECVN MRCVS

    1. European & RCVS Recognised Specialist in Veterinary Neurology, Dick White Referrals Station Farm, London Road, Six Mile Bottom, Suffolk, CB8 0UH
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A seizuring cat can be a challenging case for every veterinarian and, therefore, the correct diagnosis and the appropriate management of such a case requires understanding of the most common causes of feline seizures. The underlying cause of the seizures should be investigated by a thorough questioning of the diagnostic approach and most likely diagnoses. If the cause of the seizures can be found then the appropriate therapeutic approach may improve the prognosis. The treatment of the feline seizures is similar to the canine patients; however, the differences should be kept in mind. This article is tailored to answer the most common questions that veterinary surgeons should ask themselves when dealing with a seizuring cat.

Ancillary