Effect of Glycemic Carbohydrates on Short-term Satiety and Food Intake

Authors

  • G. Harvey Anderson PhD,

    1. Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2.
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  • Dianne Woodend MSc

    1. Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2.
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Abstract

We examine the relationships between glycemic carbohydrate and its effects on short-term satiety and food intake. Both high- and low-glycemic carbohydrates have an impact on satiety, but their effects have different time courses. High-glycemic carbohydrates are associated with a reduction in appetite and food intake in the short term (e.g., one hour), whereas the satiating effects of lower-glycemic carbohydrates appear to be delayed (e.g., 2 to 3 hours). There is no consistent evidence that an increase in blood glucose, either acute or sustained, is the primary determinant of their effects on food intake and satiety. Many other preabsorptive and postabsorptive signals for satiety exist and may be the determining factors. Further studies are needed to delineate the role of glycemic carbohydrates and their mechanisms of action in determining satiety.

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