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A risk and resiliency model of children's adjustment was evaluated, with a focus on the relationship of parenting practices to risk and protective factors. Risk factors included family stress, family conflict, parent psychopathology and low socio-economic status. Protective factors included family cohesion, family social support and family moral– religious orientation. The research hypothesis was that parenting practices would have a direct effect on child outcomes, as well as a moderating effect on the relationship between risk and protective factors and child outcomes. Three different outcomes were utilized: disruptive behaviour disorders, adaptive emotional functioning and school achievement. Participants were 80 children aged 6–12 years and their mothers. Hierarchical regression analyses suggested that the combination of family risk and protection and parenting practices was highly predictive of child functioning for both disruptive externalizing behaviours and positive emotional adaptation. It was found that negative family factors were more highly associated with negative child outcomes, whereas positive family factors were more highly associated with positive child outcomes. Family risk factors and poor parenting primarily accounted for the variance in externalizing child behaviours. Alternately, family protective factors and positive parenting primarily accounted for the variance in child adaptive behaviours. Parenting practices had a direct effect on child outcomes, but was not a strong moderator of the relationship between risk and protection factors and child outcomes.