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Childhood anxiety and attention to emotion faces in a modified stroop task

Authors

  • Julie A. Hadwin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
      Correspondence should be addressed to Dr Julie A. Hadwin, School of Psychology, Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK (e-mail: jah7@soton.ac.uk).
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  • Nick Donnelly,

    1. Centre for Visual Cognition, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
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  • Anne Richards,

    1. Department of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, UK
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  • Christopher C. French,

    1. Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, UK
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  • Umang Patel

    1. Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
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Correspondence should be addressed to Dr Julie A. Hadwin, School of Psychology, Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK (e-mail: jah7@soton.ac.uk).

Abstract

This study used an emotional face stroop task to investigate the effects of self-report trait anxiety, social concern (SC), and chronological age (CA) on reaction time to match coloured outlines of angry, happy, and neutral faces (and control faces with scrambled features) with coloured buttons in a community sample of 74 children aged 6 –12 years. The results showed an interference of colour matching for angry (relative to neutral) faces in children with elevated SC. The same effect was not found for happy or control faces. In addition, the results suggest that selective attention to angry faces in children with social concern (SC) was not significantly moderated by age.

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