The utility of a broader conceptualization of organizational identification: Which aspects really matter?

Authors


Aston Business School, Aston University, Work & Organizational Psychology Group, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK (e-mail: r.vandick@aston.ac.uk).

Abstract

Predictions of social identity and self-categorization theories about the relevance of social identification in organizational contexts are presented. We propose that different foci of identification (e.g. with own career, team, organization, occupation) as well as different dimensions of organizational identification (cognitive, affective, evaluative, and behavioural) can be separated. Furthermore, these different aspects of organizational identification are assumed to be differentially associated with work-related attitudes and behaviours. Predictions are first tested in a questionnaire study of 515 German school teachers. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that dimensions and foci can indeed be differentiated. In addition, results indicate that different aspects correlate differentially with different criteria. The results are cross-validated in two samples of 233 German school teachers and 358 bank accountants, respectively.

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