Work engagement and financial returns: A diary study on the role of job and personal resources

Authors

  • Dr Despoina Xanthopoulou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Arnold B. Bakker,

    1. Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Evangelia Demerouti,

    1. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    2. Research Institute Psychology and Health, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Wilmar B. Schaufeli

    1. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    2. Research Institute Psychology and Health, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Correspondence should be addressed to Dr Despoina Xanthopoulou, Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam 3000 DR, The Netherlands (e-mail: xanthopoulou@fsw.eur.nl).

Abstract

This study investigates how daily fluctuations in job resources (autonomy, coaching, and team climate) are related to employees' levels of personal resources (self-efficacy, self-esteem, and optimism), work engagement, and financial returns. Forty-two employees working in three branches of a fast-food company completed a questionnaire and a diary booklet over 5 consecutive workdays. Consistent with hypotheses, multi-level analyses revealed that day-level job resources had an effect on work engagement through day-level personal resources, after controlling for general levels of personal resources and engagement. Day-level coaching had a direct positive relationship with day-level work engagement, which, in-turn, predicted daily financial returns. Additionally, previous days' coaching had a positive, lagged effect on next days' work engagement (through next days' optimism), and on next days' financial returns.

Ancillary