Expectancy-value theory and predicting future employment status in the young unemployed

Authors

  • Robert M. Lynd-Stevenson

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, The Flinders University of South Australia
      School of Psychology, The Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia, Australia.
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School of Psychology, The Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia, Australia.

Abstract

A notable feature of research designed to investigate the predictors of future employment status is the absence of any theoretical framework. The ability of expectancy-value theory to predict future employment status was evaluated by interviewing 200 young unemployed people and measuring their employment status (unemployed, temporarily or permanently employed) 10-12 months later. Job expectancy and job importance predicted future employment status, separated the three groups of employment status at follow-up, and mediated the full relationship between background variables and future employment status. Overall, expectancy-value theory appears a useful framework in which to investigate the predictors of future employment status.

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