Histomorphometric Assessment of Bone Mass, Structure, and Remodeling: A Comparison Between Healthy Black and White Premenopausal Women

Authors

  • May Parisien,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Felicia Cosman,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dorcas Morgan,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michele Schnitzer,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Xiaoguang Liang,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeri Nieves,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Laura Forese,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marjorie Luckey,

    1. Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Diane Meier,

    1. Department of Geriatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Victor Shen,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert Lindsay,

    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David W. Dempster

    Corresponding author
    1. Helen Hayes Hospital, New York State Department of Health, West Haverstraw, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.
    • David Dempster, Ph.D. Regional Bone Center Helen Hayes Hospital Route 9W West Haverstraw, NY 10993 U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This work was presented in abstract form at the Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Abstract

While noninvasive studies of bone mass and turnover in blacks and whites abound, histologic evaluations are very rare. We have performed a comparative bone histomorphometric study of iliac biopsies from 55 healthy, premenopausal women including 21 blacks (mean age 33.4 + 1.2 years) and 34 whites (mean age 32.5 + 0.8 years) of comparable age, weight, body composition, education, and lifestyle. Biochemical indices of mineral metabolism: parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, serum ionized calcium, serum phosphorus, and urinary calcium/creatinine were measured in the fasting state. Blacks had lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D (31.5 ± 3.36 vs. 63.21 ± 3.79 nmol/l, p = 0.0001). Histomorphometric indices of bone volume, structure, and connectivity were not different between groups. The following indices of bone remodeling were also similar in both groups: eroded perimeter, osteoid width, mineralizing perimeter, tissue-based bone formation rate, osteoid maturation time, active formation period, and activation frequency. However, osteoid perimeter (black [B] = 15.85 ± 1.30 vs. white [W] = 9.49 ± 0.70%, p = 0.0002), osteoid area (B = 2.55 ± 0.32 vs. W = 1.39 ± 0.12%, p = 0.003), single-labeled perimeter (B = 5.46 ± 0.54 vs. W = 4.04 ± 0.33%, p = 0.03), mineralization lag time (B = 38.18 ± 4.04 vs. W = 21.83 ± 1.60 days, p < 0.009), and total formation period (B = 148.15 ± 19.70 vs. W = 84.04 ± 7.62 days, p = 0.0056) were higher in blacks than in whites. The quiescent perimeter (B = 76.91 ± 1.40 vs. W = 84.25 ± 0.91%, p = 0.0001), mineral apposition rate (B = 0.70 ± 0.02 vs. W = 0.75 ± 0.02 μm/day, p = 0.066), mineralizing osteoid perimeter (B = 0.49 ± 0.04 vs. W = 0.75 ± 0.04%, p = 0.0001) and adjusted apposition rate (B = 0.35 ± 0.04 vs. W = 0.58 ± 0.04 μm3/μm2/day, p = 0.0001) were all lower in blacks than in whites. These results indicate that there are no differences in bone volume, microstructure, or turnover between black and white premenopausal women. However, there are significant differences in the mechanism of bone formation between the two groups, with a lower rate of mineralized matrix apposition within each remodeling unit and a longer total formation period in blacks than in whites. The differences appear to be the result of more frequent and/or longer inactive periods in the life span of the bone formation units in blacks. These differences may allow a greater overall deposition of bone mineral in black women and therefore help explain a higher bone mass and perhaps better bone quality in black than white women.

Ancillary