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Effective Problem Solving in Suicide Attempters Depends on Specific Autobiographical Recall

Authors

  • Leslie R. Pollock PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. is affiliated with the Institute of Medical and Social Care Research, University of Wales, Bangor, the Department of Clinical Psychology, Powys NHS Trust, and the Institute of Rural Health, Gregynog, Wales.
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  • J. Mark G. Williams PhD

    1. is Director of the Institute of Medical and Social Care Research, University of Wales, Bangor.
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Address correspondence to Dr. L. Pollock, Psychology Dept, Park Street Clinic, Newtown, SY16 1EG, United Kingdom. E-mail: leslie.pollock@powys_tr.wales.nhs.uk.

Abstract

The relationship between over-general autobiographical memory and inter-personal problem solving was investigated by comparing a group of suicide attempters with a nonsuicidal psychiatric control group and a normal control group. Results showed that suicide attempters were more over-general in memory and displayed significantly poorer problem solving than the other two groups. Furthermore, suicide attempters who were more over-general displayed greater deficits in problem solving. It was concluded that effective problem solving in suicide attempters depends on specific autobiographical recall.

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