Get access

Assault Victimization and Suicidal Ideation or Behavior Within a National Sample of U.S. Adults

Authors

  • Thomas R. Simon PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mark Anderson MD,

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Martie P. Thompson PhD,

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alex Crosby MD, MPH,

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeffrey J. Sacks MD, MPH

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The following are members of the Injury Control and Risk Survey project, which designed and conducted the survey from which these data were obtained: principal investigator: Jeffrey J. Sacks, MD, MPH; project core group: Barbara Houston, Marcie-jo Kresnow, MS, Joann M. O'Neil, BA, and Suzanne M. Smith, MD, MPH, of NCIPC; James Hersey, PhD, Rick Williams, PhD, and Aiman Zeid, MS, of Battelle; Sherry Marcy, MPH, and Deborah J. Zivan, BA of DataStat (project core group); project associates: Julie Bolen, PhD, Christine M. Branche, PhD, Peter Briss, MD, Terence Chorba, MD, MPH, Alex Crosby, MD, MPH, Yvette Davis, VMD, MPH, Jennifer Friday, PhD, Arlene Greenspan, DrPH, PT, James Mercy, PhD, Phil McClain, MS, Lloyd Potter, PhD, MPH, and Kenneth E. Powell, MD, MPH of NCIPC; Thomas Matte, MD, MPH, of the National Center for Environmental Health.

Mailstop K-60, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC, 4770 Buford Hwy., Atlanta, GA 30341–3724; fax 770–488-4349. E-mail: tsimon@cdc.gov

Abstract

Data from a nationally representative sample of 5,238 U.S. adults were used to examine the extent to which physical assault victimization was associated with suicidal ideation or behavior (SIB). The results from multivariable logistic regression analyses indicate that physical assault victimization was positively associated with SIB after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and alcohol use (OR = 3.6; 95% CI = 2.4–5.5). Those who were injured during the most recent physical assault (OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.2–6.0) and those who were assaulted by a relative (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.0–11.0) or intimate partner (OR = 7.7; 95% CI = 2.7–22.5) were significantly more like to report SIB than victims who were not injured or were assaulted by a stranger. Also, those who were victimized but not injured (OR = 5.6; 95% CI = 3.8–8.2) and those who were victimized by a stranger (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.4–6.0) were more likely to report SIB than non-victims. These results highlight the need for legal, medical, mental health, and social service providers to address the co-occurrence of violent victimization and suicidal ideation, particularly, but not exclusively, victimization by family members and intimates.

Ancillary