Get access

Can the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale Predict Repetition of Deliberate Self-poisoning in an Australian Clinical Setting?

Authors

  • Gregory Leigh Carter MB.BS, FRANZCP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Acting Director of the Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, Newcastle Mater Hospital and Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Newcastle
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kerrie Ann Clover PhD,

    1. Research Officer at the Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jennifer Lynn Bryant RN, B.nurs,

    1. Clinical Nurse Consultant with the Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ian Macgregor Whyte MB.BS, FRACP

    1. Senior Staff Specialist at the Department of Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology, Newcastle Mater Hospital and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors would like to thank Ms. Jayne Fryer for statistical advice on logistic regression and the registrars of the Hunter Mental Health Service for their assistance in completing the patient assessments. This project was supported in part by a grant from the Margaret Mitchell Research Fund, Newcastle.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gregory Carter, Dept Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, #71, Newcastle Mater Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter Regional Mail Centre, NSW 2310, Australia. E-mail: carter@mail.newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

This study tested the ability of the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale (ERRS) to identify patients at high risk for repeat deliberate self-poisoning (DSP). Consecutive DSP patients (N = 1, 317) over a 3-year period were followed-up for 12 months. A statistically significant relationship between ERRS scores and repetition was observed; however, sensitivity and specificity were low. Logistic regression analysis revealed only “previous parasuicide” contributed significantly to repetition. The ERRS had limited value in identifying patients at high risk of repeat DSP in this clinical population.

Ancillary