Review essay: Reassessing anthropology's maverick: The archaeological fieldwork of Frank Hamilton Cushing

Authors


Abstract

The Lost Itinerary of Frank Hamilton Cushing. Volume two of Frank Hamilton Cushing and the Hemenway Southwestern Archaeological Expedition, 1886–1889. Curtis M. Hinsley and David R. Wilcox, eds. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2002. xxxvi + 349 pp., illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.

The Lost Florida Manuscript of Frank Hamilton Cushing. Phyllis E. Kolianos and Brent R. Weisman, eds. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005. xiv + 281 pp., illustrations, appendixes, notes, bibliography, index.

The Florida Journals of Frank Hamilton Cushing. Phyllis E. Kolianos and Brent R. Weisman, eds. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005. xv + 161 pp., notes, illustrations, bibliography, index.

Anthropology has had many charismatic figures in its past whose work has bordered on genius and who have presaged contemporary anthropological theories, issues, the choice of research topics, methodologies, or ethical concerns. Although often marginalized in the history of anthropology, a few of these key individuals have captured our imagination and recent attention because long-lost diaries, field notes, and reports have come to light, often after years of diligent searching by dedicated scholars. This review article assesses the contributions of three recent books on one of American anthropology's most fascinating and enigmatic individuals: Frank Hamilton Cushing. These works focus on Cushing's groundbreaking regional research in the American Southeast (Florida) and the Southwest (Arizona) and tell us much about the foundational values of our discipline.

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