NAPA Bulletin

REHABILITATION, RESISTANCE, AND RETURN: SERVICE LEARNING AND THE QUEST FOR CIVIL SOCIETY IN BOSNIA

Authors


Abstract

In 1996, shortly after termination of the Bosnian civil war and the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords, the University of Denver established a service learning program in the Balkans. Now, about to enter its eighth consecutive year of operation, “Project Bosnia” has become the university's longest-running service learning/field school initiative. Each summer, from ten to 15 students (representing disciplines as diverse as anthropology, international relations, and law) participate in on-site, agency-based activities that allow them to hone both their community outreach and applied research skills. Some serve as summer school teachers in the small town of Vares. Many work with refugees and internally displaced persons in Sarajevo, the capitol. Placement agencies include the International Commission on Missing Persons, America's Development Foundation, the International Crisis Group, World Vision, the Mine Action Center, and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees. In-class, academic work directed by the author complements each student's fieldwork.

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