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Detection of Modified Tyrosines as an Inflammation Marker in a Photo-aged Skin Model

Authors


*email: y-shimmoto@kose.co.jp (Yukiko Ishitsuka)

Abstract

Reactive nitrogen species, produced during the process of inflammation induced by various factors including UV radiation, modify amino acids in crucial proteins. It is assumed that skin tissue is more likely to be modified, as it is located at the outer layer of a body that is exposed to UV radiation on a daily basis. To investigate the influence of the modified tyrosine on UV-exposed skin, we detected the nitrotyrosine or halogenated tyrosine and dityrosine in photo-aged model mice. The back skin of mice was exposed to a dose of 10 J cm−2 day−1 every day for 15 weeks. Samples exhibiting typical symptoms of photo aging were provided to the immunofluorescence study. The quantification of modified proteins was accomplished through a chemical analytical method known as HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of the irradiated skin samples showed that all modified tyrosine except nitrotyrosine demonstrated statistically significant increases. The molecular weights of major modified proteins, confirmed as 25–50 kDa, were measured using Western blot analysis with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody. Furthermore, the immunofluorescence study verified that the localization of myeloperoxidase conformed to that of nitrotyrosine. This result suggests that the modified tyrosine was produced during the process of inflammation by UV irradiation. In this study, we used a low dose of UV irradiation to which we are exposed in daily life. Our results suggest that UV exposure in daily life may induce the production of modified tyrosines and skin aging.

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