Primary and secondary cytomegalovirus in pregnancy

Authors

  • Fergus P McCarthy MRCPI,

    Clinical Research Fellow, Corresponding author
    1. Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Republic of Ireland Email: Fergus.mccarthy@ucc.ie
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cheryl Jones MBBS (Hons) PhD FRACP,

    Associate Professor and Paediatric Infectious Diseases Consultant
    1. Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, University Of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead 2145, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shelley Rowlands FRANZCOG CMFM DDU,

    Consultant Obstetrician and Subspecialist in Maternal Fetal Medicine
    1. The Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Grattan St and Flemington Rd, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michelle Giles MBBS (Hons) FRACP

    Infectious Diseases Consultant
    1. The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; and The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Prahran, Victoria 3181, Australia; and Monash Medical Centre, Clayton Campus, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Republic of Ireland Email: Fergus.mccarthy@ucc.ie

Abstract

  • • Cytomegalovirus is the commonest cause of congenital viral infection in developed countries.
  • • Infection is asymptomatic in 90% of individuals.
  • • Forty percent of pregnant women with primary infection transmit it to their fetus.
  • • Ten percent of infants with congenital cytomegalovirus display clinical manifestations at birth and are at risk of neurological sequelae.
  • • While routine antenatal testing is not currently recommended, congenital infection remains a significant obstetric management problem.

Learning objectives:

  • • To learn about the incidence, diagnosis and sequelae of cytomegalovirus in pregnancy.
  • • To become familiar with treatment options for the management of congenital cytomegalovirus.

Ethical issues:

  • • Should practitioners recommend routine cytomegalovirus screening in pregnancy?
  • • Is a randomised controlled trial necessary before offering treatment with hyperimmune globulin for congenital cytomegalovirus?

Please cite this article as: McCarthy FP, Jones C, Rowlands S, Giles M. Primary and secondary cytomegalovirus in pregnancy. The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist 2009;11:96–100.

Ancillary