Patterns of Prescribing ACE Inhibitors after Myocardial Infarction

Authors

  • Dr. Aileen Bown Luzier Pharm.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Pharmacy, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    2. Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Anjana Navsarikar Pharm.D.,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Pharmacy, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Michael F. Wilson M.D.,

    1. Department of Medicine, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Khalid Ashai M.D.,

    1. Department of Medicine, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Alan Forrest Pharm.D.

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Pharmacy, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    2. Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory, KALEIDA Health, Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York
    Search for more papers by this author

SUNY at Buffalo, Department of Pharmacy Practice, 313 Cooke Hall, Buffalo NY 14260-1200

Abstract

We attempted to determine physician prescribing patterns of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in patients who experienced a myocardial infarction, stratified by left ventricular function. We retrospectively reviewed drug therapy at discharge in 534 patients to assess prescription of ACE inhibitor therapy, including dosage. Thirty-four percent of patients were discharged taking an ACE inhibitor, of whom only 11% received recommended dosages. The drugs were prescribed more often for patients who had an ejection fraction below 40% than for those with an ejection fraction of 40% or above (54% vs 28%, p< 0.05). We conclude that ACE inhibitors are underprescribed for patients who experienced a myocardial infarction, illustrating the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, and the need for programs to ensure optimal medical management.

Ancillary