Inviting Outsiders Inside Disciplinary Literacies: An Interview With Cynthia Greenleaf, Gayle Cribb, and Heather Howlett

Authors


e-mail cgreenl@wested.org.

e-mail GCribb@dixonusd.org.

e-mail howletth@howellschools.com.

e-mail david.moore@asu.edu.

Abstract

In this Research Connections column, Editor David Moore interviews Cynthia Greenleaf, Gayle Cribb, and Heather Howlett. Greenleaf codirects the Strategic Literacy Initiative and leads professional development projects in its Reading Apprenticeship instructional framework. Her approach to disciplinary literacy instruction is based on her findings that readers do well to clarify and develop their reading processes through metacognitive conversations. Cribb and Hoslett are secondary teachers who have participated in the Reading Apprenticeship training. Cribb realized the value of linking literacy with her history teaching when her initial attempts at engaging students in conversations about historical texts were productive and students more and more began reading and thinking historically. Howlett was persuaded to link literacy with science especially when her students who struggled in science benefited from discussing their thoughts and understandings of various science texts.

Ancillary