PLANT FUNCTIONAL TRAITS IN RELATION TO FIRE IN CROWN-FIRE ECOSYSTEMS

Authors

  • Juli G. Pausas,

    1. CEAM Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterráneo, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnològic, Paterna, València, 46980, Spain
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ross A. Bradstock,

    1. NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Biodiversity Survey and Research Division, Box 1967, Hurstville, 2220 NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David A. Keith,

    1. NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Biodiversity Survey and Research Division, Box 1967, Hurstville, 2220 NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jon E. Keeley

    1. U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon Field Station, 47050 Generals Highway, Three Rivers, California 93271 USA, and Department of Organismic Biology, Ecology and Evolution, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 USA
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Corresponding Editor: D. P. C. Peters

  • Members of the GCTE Fire Network who have contributed to the paper are W. Hoffmann, B. Kenny, F. Lloret, and L. Trabaud

Abstract

Disturbance is a dominant factor in many ecosystems, and the disturbance regime is likely to change over the next decades in response to land-use changes and global warming. We assume that predictions of vegetation dynamics can be made on the basis of a set of life-history traits that characterize the response of a species to disturbance. For crown-fire ecosystems, the main plant traits related to postfire persistence are the ability to resprout (persistence of individuals) and the ability to retain a persistent seed bank (persistence of populations). In this context, we asked (1) to what extent do different life-history traits co-occur with the ability to resprout and/or the ability to retain a persistent seed bank among differing ecosystems and (2) to what extent do combinations of fire-related traits (fire syndromes) change in a fire regime gradient? We explored these questions by reviewing the literature and analyzing databases compiled from different crown-fire ecosystems (mainly eastern Australia, California, and the Mediterranean basin). The review suggests that the pattern of correlation between the two basic postfire persistent traits and other plant traits varies between continents and ecosystems. From these results we predict, for instance, that not all resprouters respond in a similar way everywhere because the associated plant traits of resprouter species vary in different places. Thus, attempts to generalize predictions on the basis of the resprouting capacity may have limited power at a global scale. An example is presented for Australian heathlands. Considering the combination of persistence at individual (resprouting) and at population (seed bank) level, the predictive power at local scale was significantly increased.

Ancillary