Quantitative structure-activity relationships for predicting percutaneous absorption rates

Authors

  • John D. Walker,

    Corresponding author
    1. TSCA Interagency Testing Committee, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (7401), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, Northwest, Washington, DC 20460
    • TSCA Interagency Testing Committee, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (7401), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, Northwest, Washington, DC 20460
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  • Rosemary Rodford,

    1. SEAC Toxicology Unit, Colworth, Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedford, Bedforshire MK44 ILQ, United Kingdom
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  • Grace Patlewicz

    1. SEAC Toxicology Unit, Colworth, Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedford, Bedforshire MK44 ILQ, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for predicting percutaneous absorption rates were reviewed. Overall progress has been hampered by the sparseness of good quality experimental data. A number of researchers have used the same data set to develop QSARs for predicting percutaneous absorption rates, a fact that makes it difficult, at this time, to recommend one or two QSARs for predicting percutaneous absorption rates. Identification of chemicals within domains of large chemical universes that should be tested to improve QSARs and the subsequent development of experimental percutaneous absorption rates for those chemicals will facilitate the development of more robust QSARs for predicting percutaneous absorption rates.

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