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Effect of soil properties on copper release in soil solutions at low moisture content

Authors

  • Alexander A. Ponizovsky,

    1. Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
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  • Sagar Thakali,

    1. Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
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  • Herbert E. Allen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
    • Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
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  • Dominic M. Di Toro,

    1. Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
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  • Amanda J. Ackerman

    1. Center for the Study of Metals in the Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, USA
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  • Presented at the Symposium on Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils, 14th Annual Meeting, SETAC Europe Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, April 18–22, 2004.

Abstract

Copper partitioning at moisture content of 1.2-fold the field moisture capacity (corresponding to a soil water potential of 7.84 J/kg; pF = 1.9) was studied in 11 soils with pH 3.4 to 6.8 and an organic matter content of 4.1 to 233 g C/kg. Soil solutions were separated with the centrifuge method and analyzed to determine pH, Cu2+ activity, dissolved organic carbon, and Cu, Ca, Mg, and Na concentrations. Soil organic matter content, total Cu content, and soil pH were the main variables explaining variation in Cu activity in soil solutions. Based on total Cu, soil organic matter content, and soil solution pH, the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) VI assemblage model provided estimates of Cu2+ activity, {Cu2+}, with a root mean square error of the predicted pCu (i.e., —log{Cu2+}) of 0.77.

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