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Transfer of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a soil-plant-invertebrate food chain: A microcosm study

Authors

  • Renaud Scheifler,

    Corresponding author
    1. Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
    • Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
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  • Annette de Vaufleury,

    1. Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
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  • Michaël Cœurdassier,

    1. Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
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  • Nadia Crini,

    1. Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
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  • Pierre-Marie Badot

    1. Environmental Biology, EA 3184 Aff. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, University of Franche-Comté, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besançon Cedex, France
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  • Presented at the Symposium on Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils, 14th Annual Meeting, SETAC Europe Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, April 18–22, 2004.

Abstract

The transfer of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn was evaluated in a soil-plant (lettuce, Lactuca sativa)–invertebrate (snail, Helix aspersa) food chain during a microcosm experiment. Two agricultural soils, polluted and unpolluted, were studied. Lettuce was cultivated for eight weeks before introduction of snails into the microcosms (M-snails). In a parallel experiment, snails were exposed to lettuce only (i.e., without soil) in simpler exposure devices called containers (C-snails). Snail exposure duration was eight weeks for both M- and C-snails. No effects on snail survival were found. Both M- and C-snails exposed to polluted soil showed a growth reduction, but only after two weeks of exposure. Time-dependent accumulation in M-snails exposed to the polluted environment showed a regular increase of Cd and Zn concentrations over time and a rapid increase of Pb concentrations within the first two weeks, which then remained stable. Copper and Ni concentrations did not increase during any of the experiments. Concentrations in M- and C-snails were compared to estimate the relative contribution of soil and plant to the total bioaccumulation. The results suggest that the soil contribution may be higher than 80% for Pb, from 30 to 60% for Zn, and from 2 to 40% for Cd.

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