Model studies of corrosion-induced copper runoff fate in soil

Authors

  • Sofia Bertling,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Corrosion Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
    • Division of Corrosion Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Fien Degryse,

    1. Laboratory for Soil and Water Management, Catholic University of Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Inger Odnevall Wallinder,

    1. Division of Corrosion Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Erik Smolders,

    1. Laboratory for Soil and Water Management, Catholic University of Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Christofer Leygraf

    1. Division of Corrosion Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Presented at the Symposium on Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils, 14th Annual Meeting, SETAC Europe Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, April 18–22, 2004.

Abstract

Laboratory experiments have been performed with 3-cm soil columns simulating the fate of corrosion-induced copper runoff in contact with soil. The investigation simulates approximately 30 years (assuming an infiltration surplus of 25 cm/year) of continuous percolation of copper containing runoff water of a concentration realistic at the immediate release situation (4.8 mg/L) into four soils representative of urban conditions. Two of the three investigated topsoils reached their breakthrough of copper within the simulated time, while the third topsoil did not show a breakthrough. The subsoil reached a breakthrough after approximately 10 years of simulated exposure. To simulate more realistic outdoor scenarios, the laboratory-obtained breakthrough curves were modeled with Hydrus-1D® using a Langmuir-Freundlich model to describe copper sorption, the parameters of which were estimated from soil properties (pH, organic carbon content). The model predicts longer breakthrough times with increasing pH and organic content of the soil and with decreasing concentrations of copper and dissolved organic carbon in the runoff water. The time span for copper in runoff water (at concentrations of 0.01–10 mg/L) to reach a soil depth of 50 cm varied between 170 and more than 8,000 years for the predicted field scenarios.

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